Cursed Child – Because I need to talk about it.

harry-potter-and-the-cursed-child-750x315It’s been 2 months since I read this book and I’m still not over it yet. As much as I was pissed off at this piece of pure disappointment, I didn’t write about it until now because part of me didn’t want to talk about it. After me and my brother read it, we vented out our anger for this book for one hour and then promised each other that we’ll just pretend that this book never happened.

The only problem is that I can’t. I can’t because it exists, in physical form and will exist until the end of this world. And I wish I could just wipe it off my memory, but I know I can’t. Being so emotionally attached to Harry Potter since my early childhood, this book has been nothing less than a blow for me. I wish I could stand in front of Jo and scream “You had 9 years and you gave us this?”

As much as I’m saddened by the story they gave us, I’ve come to realize that so many people around me actually liked it. That’s part of the reason why I’m writing this post now, after so many days. One of my friends finished this book yesterday, came to my room and said “I loved it so much, I wish they would make a movie on this.” and I just sat there thinking…”Wait, are we talking about the cursed child here? But … but how do you not see that there’s so much wrong with this book? Are you kidding me?” Although I didn’t say that, because she was not the first person to tell me that. While one of my other friends described it as ‘breath of fresh air’, another described it as ‘awesome!’. I don’t understand how they fail to see what’s wrong with this book and neither do I try to understand. But yes, I do understand why has it been so difficult for me to make peace with this book.

If you haven’t read the cursed child yet, maybe now would be a good time to stop reading this post now. SPOILERS AHEAD!

  1. First of all, I don’t know what characters they wrote in this book, but they definitely weren’t the same ones I grew up with. Harry can’t talk like that to his son. Harry can’t talk like that to Professor McGonagall. Not just Harry, everyone. The way they talk, the way they react to things, everything they did, it wasn’t just relate-able at all.
  2. Prototype time turner? Are you joking? We all know time turners could let them stay back in time for more than 5 minutes. Are you trying to tell us that the only time turner that was left, the last one, was the prototype one with a restriction of 5 minutes?
  3. Okay, even if it was, I think it would’ve taken more than 5 minutes for Scorpio to go back in time, meet Ron, Hermione and Snape, explain to them the whole situation, do the task he was intending to and come back again.
  4. Let’s talk a bit about Hermoine here. Minister of Magic, brightest witch of her age… you would think she would be capable enough to put protection charms in her office, which would be beyond two 14 year olds to break. Wouldn’t you?
  5. And Ron? Just because he wasn’t an auror or minister of magic or whatever and ran a joke shop, doesn’t mean you’d portray him as nothing more than a comic relief. Don’t tell us you reduced him to that after everything he had done for Harry and for the wizarding world.
  6. Oh and, can somebody please explain how in this world Harry could speak parseltongue even though the horcrux in him was destroyed ?
  7. About the big revelation in this book, Voldemort and Bellatrix’s love child, Delphi… okay first off, Voldemort wasn’t even a human himself, how could he give birth to another human? Second, WHEN DID THIS HAPPEN? Where does it fit into the timeline? After escaping azkaban, and before her death, Bellatrix hardly had two years, during which she was working as Voldemort’s right hand. When did she get time to get pregnant? If Delphi was born just before the Battle of Hogwarts, wouldn’t Harry, Hermoine and Ron have noticed her pregnancy in the Malfoy Manor?
  8. More than the whole Delphi issue, what pisses me off even more is that they made Cedric Diggory into a death eater in alternate universe, just because he was humiliated. I mean shouldn’t Neville be a death eater too by that concept, since he has been humiliated more times in the entire series than any other character?
  9. The prophecy… who made the prophecy? Where did it come from? How was Minister of Magic not aware of this, since, as I recall, Department of mysteries stored copies of all prophecies made in the wizarding world? What was the proof of its authenticity? I mean WHAT? WHY? HOW???
  10. Making Harry watch his parents getting murdered. You know it wasn’t needed Jo. Why would you needlessly want to make his life more tragic? You didn’t have to do it.
  11. The trolley witch. ARE YOU SERIOUS??
  12. “For Voldemort and Valor.” I almost puked. Oh and also, is everyone now comfortable taking Voldemort’s name?

There might be many more other little reasons to be disappointed with the book, which I may not be remembering right now. But anyway the whole point is, this book killed my little potterhead heart.
What about you?

Furious 7

Furious-7Amongst all the madness of exam season, I somehow managed to take some time out to go and watch Furious 7. Before I start on how much I LOVED it, here’s a short summary of the plot from IMDB, because I couldn’t have explained it better…

Dominic Torretto and his crew thought they left the criminal mercenary life behind. They defeated an international terrorist named Owen Shaw and went their seperate ways. But now, Shaw’s brother, Deckard Shaw is out killing the crew one by one for revenge. Worse, a Somalian terrorist called Jakarde, and a shady government official called “Mr. Nobody” are both competing to steal a computer terrorism program called God’s Eye, that can turn any technological device into a weapon. Torretto must reconvene with his team to stop Shaw and retrieve the God’s Eye program while caught in a power struggle between terrorist and the United States government.

The movie was overwhelmingly mindblowing! Right from the very first scene, I knew this was going to be good. And when I say good, I mean CRAZY good. And I was right about that. Yes, the film showed some really silly gravity defying stunts and it was a little bit cliched at times. Also, the plot could’ve been stronger, considering how Dom’s group was fighting Somalian terrorists for a computer program and it’s maker, all of which basically had nothing to do with them, all because a covert ops team proposed to ally with them in return of their help to deal with Deckard Shaw. I mean most of the time they were just fighting a third party, when actually their enemy was just one person. That looked a teensy bit off to me. BUT, who cares?? I mean, despite all these little flaws, this movie has everything you want to see in a blockbuster. Who doesn’t want to see cars skydiving from an aircraft and racing through one skyscraper to another at such high altitudes? Call it mindless all you want, but you can’t deny, it was fun to watch.
Jason Statham, the new addition to the movie’s cast, playing Deckard Shaw was brilliant in his role. That guy had some real issues though, throwing bombs everywhere and at everyone. An extremely strong antagonist and a very tough one to beat. He practically looked ‘indestructible’ to me throughout the movie. I really really hope he comes back in the next installment. Vin, Paul, Michelle, Dwayne, Jordana, Tyrese and Ludacris were all fantastic as usual.

Putting all of it’s action packed, adrenaline rush inducing, edge-of-the-seat thrill aside, we all know what this movie stood for. This movie was meant to be a tribute to it’s late actor Paul Walker and that, it did beautifully. Salute to it’s makers, who gave this movie an exceptionally moving and poetic end, and more than succeeding in bidding a warm farewell to a departed family member. In the last scene, you could see it in Vin Diesel’s eyes… it wasn’t Dom saying goodbye to Brian, it was Vin saying goodbye to Paul. That scene gave out some major sentimental vibes. The song ‘See You Again’ by Wiz Khalifa and Charlie Puth only added to the beauty of the climax. It got me, to be honest. And every single person at the cinema. In my twenty years of life, I had never seen the entire hall clapping in unison at the end of the movie. But it happened today. That in itself says how much people loved Paul.

It’s been a long day without you my friend
And I’ll tell you all about it when I see you again

For Paul.

The Bell Jar

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“I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”

This book was recommended to me by Ekatemari, when I reviewed Catcher In The Rye. If you’re reading this, thank you so much for the recommendation. 🙂  So here’s what I think about it…

I’m at a loss for words. I don’t know where to start. So dark, so gloomy yet moving and relatable to an extent.
Esther Greenwood, 20 years old, talented, successful, has everything she ever wanted in her life. But she’s not excited. There are way too many things which worry her, and ultimately she finds herself trapped under a bell jar.

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What I liked so much about Esther Greenwood was her eccentric character. She doesn’t want to waste away her life limiting herself by the rules set by the society. She wants to do everything and be everything. Yet, when she meets people more talented than her, she doubts herself and feels inadequate. She hates hypocrites. She absolutely hates the idea of living her life in the way girls were expected to in that time. She throws out all of her new, expensive clothes, one by one, out of the hotel window as a symbol of rejecting to conform with the expectations of society. She’s not fascinated by big cities and parties. Cadavers and pickled foetuses catch her attention.  She imagines things she should have said to people. And then one day when nothing goes right, she decides ‘to spend the summer writing a novel that would fix a lot of people’ , gets stuck on the first line, then ditches the idea. She’s bold. She’s determined. She’s talented. She’s crazy. WHAT’S NOT TO LIKE ABOUT HER! I don’t remember how many times I screamed “Yes! Yes! EXACTLY!” while reading this book. It’s amazing how much you can connect to a book written 53 years ago.

By this point in the book, Esther had become like a friend for me. She made me laugh, she made me think and made me privy to all of her deepest secrets, and then as she descended into depression, I watched her lose all of her battles with herself. However, the book ended on a rather positive note. Positive, as in, open ended, leaving it on the readers to decide whether in their opinion, she managed to overcome her inner demons or not. Considering the semi autobiographical nature of this book, what Sylvia Plath endured in her life is a secret to none. Every single page of this book felt haunted by Sylvia’s spirit. And it’s really saddening to know in that much detailed manner how she battled with her own self every single day and eventually ended her life. But the fact that she left an open end for Esther (who is basically her own self) tells that among all the struggles she went through, she had a hope for herself. And I believe that Esther lived. Giving support and hope to thousands of people fighting depression.

The other characters of the book weren’t developed in detail, just the right amount was explained about them as required for the story.  Esther was the sole star of the book and the way her character was written was commendable. Every single thought of her was nicely described. The book, altogether, was very intense and powerful most of the time, filled with dark humour at times. I started reading this book knowing that Sylvia Plath was a poet, but she proved herself as an equally good author too. The imageries set in the book were absolutely alluring, the fig tree one being the most striking of all.

“I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn’t quite make out. I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn’t make up my mind which of the figs I would choose. I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.”

The best thing about this book was it’s straightforwardness and pure truthfulness, taking us into extreme depths of a mind of a neurotic person. It made me empathise with her on levels I didn’t know I could for any person long gone. But I don’t want to just remember her for someone who was clinically depressed. She was independent, she was an individual having an unconventional  approach to life, she was loving, she was funny, she was brave, she was intrepid and more than anything, she was extremely talented who could put out her thoughts into beautiful poetries. And the world should remember her for all these qualities, rather than just sticking her head in the oven.

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